Dexter + Chaney Blog

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In the course of any given week I'll engage with a number of folks outside of my company. I may visit some local customers, give an online presentation of our latest construction software to prospective clients, or talk to an industry analyst. But this time of year I'm reminded of how large and diverse our industry is because this is the time when I hit the road.

Straddling the Project Management Fence

The term “straddling the fence” carries with it some negative connotations—being indecisive, trying to take two sides of the same argument, etc. So when a project manager friend of mine and I were talking recently and he said that he spends much of his day straddling the fence, I was confused since this particular individual happens to be fairly opinionated.

Tapas, Top Sirloin & Construction Software

I suspect that a number of my readers have been through the city of Amarillo, Texas, and some probably live there. But if you aren’t one of them, let me introduce you to The Big Texan Steak House. This is the original “if you can eat it, it’s free” establishment, home of the legendary 72 oz. top sirloin steak. Eat it in one hour, and it costs you nothing (well, no money, anyway).

Cloud Based Construction Software

It’s a rare sunny January day here in Seattle as I write this, so I’m filled with a sense of “anything is possible” as we start into 2013. Of course for those of us who own or manage businesses the trick is to sort through what’s possible and make choices based on what will probably happen. Said differently, we need to look at all the “coulds” and then decide on our “shoulds.”

Science of Heavy Equipment Management – Part 3

In my last two blog posts, I discussed some of what I’ve learned over the years about equipment management, most notably from one of the industry’s leading experts in the field, Dr. Mike Vorster. I covered splitting data into owning and operating rates, then about re-combining that data to help optimize machine usage. This week I’ll wrap up by covering some of the issues surrounding data gathering for equipment management.

Science of Heavy Equipment Management

I’m fortunate to have made the acquaintance of Dr. Mike Vorster a few years back. Mike is the David H. Burrows Professor Emeritus of Construction Engineering at Virginia Tech and is author of Construction Equipment Economics, a handbook on the management of construction equipment fleets. His ideas and methods regarding the management of heavy equipment are, in my opinion, the gospel for the industry. I’ve even incorporated them in to the software we develop for equipment management.

construction documents and tablet -Construction Software Management

Last week I went along with one of our product managers to visit a local client—a large general contractor in the Seattle area. The purpose of the visit was to get some feedback on a few new construction management software features we’re developing. As always, these folks gave us great input to help prioritize our efforts. But in talking to employees from both the business management and operations sides of the company, I also came away with a new way of looking at an old issue.

Construction Documents and Data

Last week I went along with one of our product managers to visit a local client—a large general contractor in the Seattle area. The purpose of the visit was to get some feedback on a few new construction management software features we’re developing. As always, these folks gave us great input to help prioritize our efforts. But in talking to employees from both the business management and operations sides of the company, I also came away with a new way of looking at an old issue.

Construction Management Stairs

A colleague recently shared with me the below graphic from a Caterpillar presentation he attended, which got me thinking about how managers and owners run their construction businesses. I know the way I’ve managed my company over the years has changed. As we’ve grown we’ve put more formal processes in place and my focus has shifted more toward the bigger picture.

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