19
Jan

AccessibilityAs we look ahead at a promising 2015 for the construction industry, my thoughts are on messaging. Right now, the sales and marketing teams here at Dexter + Chaney are gearing up for yet another whirlwind trade show season. With that comes honing the message of what our own construction management software can help our clients achieve. In thinking about how to effectively communicate that message, I was reminded of something I saw during a trade show around this time last year.

07
Jan

Increased GrowthGreetings folks. It has been a while since I’ve sat down and put thoughts to keyboard in this blog. So to paraphrase that song from AC/DC, I’ve been too long and I’m glad to be back.

07
Nov

budgeting for construction jobsWith November here I know that many companies, including my own, are looking at their 2013 costs and revenue, and determining 2014 forecasts and budgets. This process is tedious, complex, and very important. Many aspects of your business have to be considered – your position in the market, possible threats based on competition and the economy, opportunities for growth and potential new work, etc.

10
Oct

change construction accounting softwareThroughout the year, I talk to a lot of construction business owners and accounting staff who are considering a change in their construction accounting software. I’m occasionally asked by companies, particularly those on the proverbial fence, why they should make a switch. However, I like to approach the question a little differently, because while I like when companies choose my software, I want the change to be best for them. Companies should consider the reasons they want to switch – is there a specific reason or are they just going through the motions. Not every company needs to change their construction software, but there are some definite reasons to switch, and here are my top three.

26
Sep

everything in the cloudI’m constantly amazed by the speed with which new technology and new devices are reaching the marketplace. It was only a few years ago that the iPad debuted, but tablet sales have grown so fast that now more than one-third of adults in the U.S. own one. Laptops continue to become lighter, hybrid tablet/laptops are available, and smart phones are becoming the norm. Not too long ago, Google released its Chrome Book – a laptop that runs everything in the cloud and doesn’t require any software downloads. Instead, users access their documents, spreadsheets, and other files in the cloud. As a developer of cloud-based software, I couldn’t help but try one out. In doing so, I came to several conclusions about how the cloud is shaping the behaviors of both software users and developers.